Club of Rome

The Club of Rome was created in 1968 by the Morgenthau Group, its original purpose was to create a New World Order by the year 2000. The Club of Rome has an hidden agenda to divide the entire world into ten regions or kingdoms.

Establishment of the Club of Rome

Rockefeller's Private Estate in Bellagio

Rockefeller's private estate in Bellagio

In April, 1968, the Club of Rome was founded by members of the original Morgenthau group during a meeting at Rockefeller's private house in Bellagio, Italy. The meeting was organized by Aurelio Peccei, an Italian industrialist who had close relations to the Olivetti Corporation and Fiat. He claimed to have solutions for world peace and prosperity, which could be accomplished through a New World Order.


The Club of Rome was established with 75 prominent industrialists, economists and scientists members from 25 nations. The Bilderberg Group and the Club of Rome are the most important foreign policy arms of the Round table, which is led by the Committee of 300.


Many of the Club of Rome members were drawn from NATO, and they have been able to create a lot of what NATO claims are its policies. Through Lord Carrington, they were able to split NATO into two groups, a left-wing political faction, and its former military alliance.


The 10 Kingdoms

The Club of Rome acts as a research institute on political, social and economic issues, and claims that "there is no other viable alternative to the future survival of mankind than a new global community under a single form of government."


On 17, September, 1973, the Club of Rome published a report entitled the "Regionalized and Adaptive Model of the Global World System", which was authored by Eduard Pestel and Mihajlo Mesarovic. The report revealed the Club's intention to divide the world into ten economic/political regions, called "Kingdoms", which would unite the entire world under a common leadership. These regions are:

  • North America
  • Western Europe
  • Japan
  • Australia and South Africa
  • Eastern Europe
  • Latin America
  • North Africa and the Middle East
  • Main Africa
  • South and Southeast Asia
  • Centrally Planned Asia

Club of Rome 10 Kingdoms

the Club of Rome planned to divide the entire world into ten economic/political regions, which it refers to as 'kingdoms'


The term "Kingdoms" was left out, when the plan was released in a book entitled "Mankind at the Turning Point", which stated that the solutions to the problems of the world could only "be developed in a global context."


Population Control

In 1973, the Club of Rome released a report entitled "Limits to Growth", which dealt with the problem of overpopulation.


In the August, 1980 edition of Fusion magazine, Howard Odum, a marine biologist at the University of Florida, who was a member of the Club of Rome, was quoted, saying: "It's necessary that the U.S. cut its population by 2/3 within the next 50 years." He did not mention how this should be accomplished.

During the presidency of Jimmy Carter, a task force was created to expand the "Limits on Growth" document, and on 24 July, 1980, a two-volume report was released entitled "Global 2000 Report" which had been authored by former Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance. The report, which was presented to President Carter, attempted to project global economic trends for the next two decades, and indicated that there aren't enough resources on earth to support the expected dramatic increase in the world population. The document says the population of the United States should be reduced by 100 million people by the year 2050.


About half a year later, the Council on Environmental Quality made recommendations based on the document, entitled "Global Future: A Time to Act." They proposed an aggressive plan to control the population which included contraception, abortion and sterilization.


In August, 1982, the Executive Intelligence Review released a document entitled "Global 2000: Blueprint for Genocide" which stated the 2 before mentioned Presidential documents "are correctly understood as political statements of intent - the intent on the part of such policy centers as the Council on Foreign Relations, the Trilateral Commission, and the International Monetary Fund, to pursue policies that will result not only in the death of the 120 million cited in the reports, but in the death of upwards of two billion people by the year 2000." Throughout the world, the Club of Rome has said that genocide should be used to eliminate people who they refer to as "useless eaters."

U.S. Association of the Club of Rome

In 1976, the U.S. Association of the Club of Rome (USACOR) was created, its purpose is to shut down the U.S. economy gradually. Henry Kissinger was then, and still is, an high ranked member in the service of the Royal Institute for International Affairs, a member of the Club of Rome and the Council on Foreign Relations.


Kissinger had a major role in the attempt to destabilize the U.S. by means of three wars, in the Middle East, Vietnam and Korea. In the Gulf War the United States Army acted as mercenaries for the Committee of 300 in bringing Kuwait back under its control and at the same time making an example out of Iraq so that other small countries would not attempt anything against the wishes of the Committee.


General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq

General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq

Death of General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq

On 17 August, 1988, the President of Pakistan General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq died during a suspicious airplane crash. It's rumored the Club of Rome was ordered by the Committee of 300 to eliminate ul-Haq.


The Turkish Secret Service warned ul-Haq not to travel by plane, as he was targeted for a mid-air bombing. With this in mind, ul-Haq took an U.S. team with him as "an insurance policy," as he commented to his close advisers. On board the flight there were a number of United States officials, including a U.S. Army Defense Intelligence Agency group led by Brigadier General Herber Wassom and U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan Arnold Lewis Raphel.


Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq Crashed Airplane

It's rumored the Club of Rome sabotaged the airplane with General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq in it

Shortly after the plane took off, the control tower lost contact with the aircraft. Witnesses who saw the airplane in the air afterward claim it was flying erratically, then nosedived and exploded when it crashed into the ground.


32 people died in the incident, including Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee General Akhtar Abdur Rahman, close associate of ul-Haq, Brigadier Siddique Salik, General Herbert M. Wassom, the head of the U.S. Military aid mission to Pakistan and the U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan Arnold Lewis Raphel.


The death of ul-Haq has raised many questions. The investigation of the crash led to the conclusion that the most probable cause of the crash was sabotage. It's also suggested that poisonous gases were released which incapacitated the crew members and passengers, which would explain why no Mayday signal was given. There is no doubt that a team of professionals were behind the crash.



Source


makanga@2014-10-16 01:30:37

conspiracy theory icon

Rose@2014-10-04 18:49:12

conspiracy theory icon

I just have a question...why is Japan isolated in the 10 Kingdom map? 

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